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Background

The Methodist Hymn-Book Illustrated
John Telford, 1909

‘Du unvergleichlich’s Gut,’ Heilige Seelenlust, 2nd edition, 1668, Book v., headed ‘She (the soul) contrasts the majesty of God with her nothingness.’

John Wesley’s translation appeared in Hymns and Sacred Poems, 1739; Poetical Works, i. 141.

In verse 5 the old reading is restored, which had been weakened into

Yes! self-sufficient as Thou art.

Verse 4 is founded on the Apocrypha (Wisdom of Solomon 11:20).
#HymnalShort NameTitleAuthorTuneComposerVerses
396Congregational Hymnary, 1916CH16O God, of Good the Unfathomed SeaJohann Scheffler (1624-1677), Translation by Rev. John Wesley (1703-1791), alteredQueen StreetF. Heddon Bond (1875-1948)4
494Hymns Ancient and Modern, New Edition, 1904HAM04O God, of Good the Unfathomed SeaRev. John Wesley (1703-1791)BoltonSamuel Sebastian Wesley (1810-1876)5
017bMethodist Hymn and Tune Book, 1918MHT18O God, of Good the Unfathomed SeaJohann Scheffler (1624-1677), Translation by Rev. John Wesley (1703-1791)DresdenSwiss Melody5
017aMethodist Hymn and Tune Book, 1918MHT18O God, of Good the Unfathomed SeaJohann Scheffler (1624-1677), Translation by Rev. John Wesley (1703-1791)LucerneStrasburg Gesangbuch, 15255
036The Methodist Hymn-Book, 1904MHB04O God, of Good the Unfathomed SeaJohann Scheffler (1624-1677), Translation by Rev. John Wesley (1703-1791) from Hymns and Sacred Poems, 1739TarsusSir John Goss (1800-1880)8
261bThe Oxford Hymn Book, 1908OHB08O God, of Good the Unfathomed SeaJohann Scheffler (1624-1677), Translation by Rev. John Wesley (1703-1791)BoltonSamuel Sebastian Wesley (1810-1876)3
261aThe Oxford Hymn Book, 1908OHB08O God, of Good the Unfathomed SeaJohann Scheffler (1624-1677), Translation by Rev. John Wesley (1703-1791)BridgewaterHenry Lawes (1596-1662), Harmonization by Edward John Hopkins (1818-1901)3
323Church Hymnal (Ireland), 1891ICH95O God, of Good the Unfathomed Sea!Johann Scheffler (commonly called Angelus), 1657, Translation by Rev. John Wesley, 1739St. PaulSir John Goss (1800-1880)4
119Hymnal of the Methodist Episcopal Church, 1878HME78O God, of Good the Unfathomed Sea!Johann A. Scheffler (1624-1677), Translation by Rev. John Wesley (1703-1791)NashvilleAdapted by Lowell Mason (1792-1872)4
038Wesley’s Hymns and New Supplement, 1877WHS77O God, of Good the Unfathomed Sea!Johann Scheffler (1624-1677), Translation by Rev. John Wesley (1703-1791)MonmouthGabriel Davis (circa 1768-1824)8

The texts from any two of the above sources (assuming two or more exist) can be selected to appear below side by side by selecting the source name from the drop-down lists. The Short Name abbreviations following the titles are shown in the table above:

1O God, of good the unfathomed sea!
Who would not give his heart to Thee?
Who would not love Thee with his might?
O Jesus, Lover of mankind,
Who would not his whole soul and mind,
With all his strength, to Thee unite?
2Thou shin’st with everlasting rays;
Before the insufferable blaze
Angels with both wings veil their eyes;
Yet free as air Thy bounty streams;
On all Thy works Thy mercy’s beams,
Diffusive as Thy sun’s, arise.
3Astonished at Thy frowning brow,
Earth, hell, and heaven’s strong pillars bow:
Terrible majesty is Thine!
Who then can that vast love express
Which bows Thee down to me,– who less
Than nothing am, till Thou art mine!
4High throned on heaven’s eternal hill,
In number, weight, and measure, still
Thou sweetly orderest all that is;
And yet Thou deignest to come to me,
And guide my steps, that I, with Thee
Enthroned, may reign in endless bliss.
1O God, of good the unfathomed sea,
Who would not give his heart to Thee?
Who would not love Thee with his might?
O Jesu, Lover of mankind,
Who would not his whole soul and mind,
With all his strength, to Thee unite?
2High throned on heaven’s eternal hill,
In number, weight, and measure still
Thou sweetly orderest all that is:
And yet Thou deignest to come to me,
And guide my steps, that I with Thee
Enthroned may reign in endless bliss.
3Primeval Beauty, in Thy sight
The first-born fairest sons of light
See all their brightest glories fade.
What then to me Thine eyes could turn,
In sin conceived, of woman born,
A worm, a leaf, a blast, a shade?
4Fountain of good! All blessing flows
From Thee; no want Thy fullness knows:
What but Thyself canst Thou desire?
Yet, self-sufficient as Thou art,
Thou dost desire my worthless heart;
This, only this dost Thou require.
5O God, of good the unfathomed sea,
Who would not give his heart to Thee?
Who would not love Thee with his might?
O Jesu, Lover of mankind,
Who would not his whole soul and mind,
With all his strength, to Thee unite? Amen.
BookReferenceBible Text
1 Chronicles29:11Thine, O LORD is the greatness, and the power, and the glory, and the victory, and the majesty: for all that is in the heaven and in the earth is thine; thine is the kingdom, O LORD, and thou art exalted as head above all.
Psalm118:1O give thanks unto the LORD; for he is good: because his mercy endureth for ever.
Zechariah9:17For how great is his goodness, and how great is his beauty! corn shall make the young men cheerful, and new wine the maids.
Mark12:30And thou shalt love the Lord thy God with all thy heart, and with all thy soul, and with all thy mind, and with all thy strength: this is the first commandment.
Luke10:27And he answering said, Thou shalt love the Lord thy God with all thy heart, and with all thy soul, and with all thy strength, and with all thy mind; and thy neighbour as thyself.
1 Peter1:8Whom having not seen, ye love; in whom, though now ye see him not, yet believing, ye rejoice with joy unspeakable and full of glory: